Homemade Soy Candles

Today we are excited to bring you another post in the Homemade Christmas series.  (If you missed the first post, you can find it here.)

We love this post because it can work as a gift for just about anyone and it is incredibly easy to make.  You can also customize it to your heart’s delight.  Check out the instructions below.

First, you might wonder, why soy candles?

Well, to begin, soy is a renewable resource, unlike petroleum which is what is used to make paraffin.  Additionally, soy candles burn more slowly than paraffin wax candles and they burn clean.  And finally, soy wax is cheap, much cheaper than beeswax, which is another natural option.

Here’s how you do it:

Product
Visual
Where to Buy
Milliard Natural Soy Wax with Soy Based Additives
Fekuar Wicks for Soy Wax Candle
Eastland Set of 12 Clear Standard Votive Holders
Farberware BBQ Bamboo Skewers
T-fal B1399663 Specialty Stainless Steel Double Boiler with Phenolic Handle Cookware

 

Supplies
Soy Wax Flakes
Wicks  (We got a type specially made for soy wax)
Jars –  (There are a ton of options here: mason jars, votives, shot glasses, tin cans, etc.)
Bamboo Skewers
Essential Oils (optional)

Directions
1.  Set up a double boiler.  (We used a large tin can and bent it in one place so that we would have a pour spout.)

2.  Pour or scoop your wax flakes into the can or the top part of your double boiler.  Let the water come to a boil and the wax to melt.  The wax flakes melt pretty quickly.

3.  While the wax is melting, prepare your jars.  Using bamboo skewers to position your wicks, place one wick in each jar.  (Wrap a short length of the wick around the skewer and let the bottom of the wick barely touch the bottom of the jar.)

4.  Once the wax is melted, add the essential oil (if you want a scent).  You’ll need more than you think.  We put about 20 drops per candle and the scent is either very faint or non-existent.

5. Pour the wax into votives (or whatever you are using) and allow them to cool completely.

These candles are great as gifts or work well as candles to keep in preparation for winter emergencies or other times when the power may go out.

Have you ever made candles?  Do you have any tips or tricks to share?